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The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXIV 



NEWBERG, OREGON, MARCH 14, 1923. 



NUMBER 10 



J 



Contest Shows High Class Oratory. All Contestants Close 



STUDENT CONFERENCE Linfield Wins State Oratorical Contest 

AT REED COLLEGE 
INSPIRING 

Student from Old World Would Re- 
build Order on Spiritual Basis 



The conference held at Reed Col- 
lege, March 9-11, was for the sole 
purpose of arousing educators and 
students to some of the faults in the 
American system and to promote in- 
ternational relations between all 
students. The representatives from 
Europe were Hans Tiesler of Ger- 
many, Jorgen Hoick of Copenhagen 
and Piet Roest of Levden. Delegates 
from University of Washington, 
Stanford, Pacific University, Willam- 
ette. Pacific College, U. of .California 
and all are Institutes of Technalogy. 

The opening session was held Fri- 
day afternoon and the foreign stu- 
dents struck the keynote of the Con- 
ference with their talks on "A Re- 
versed World Order' and "The Lack 
of Recognition of True Spiritual 
Values in Modern Education." 

Two discussion groups were then 
formed, one topic being "Foreign Re- 
lations," the other "Curriculum 
Changes Necessary to Aid the Rever- 
sal of the present World Order." The 
latter group accomplished much more 
than the first and briefly the for- 
eign students outlined the spirit of 
education abroad, which of late years 
has tended toward the development 
of the individual. Another point 
and Dr Scholz were very insistent 
upon which the foreign students 
was the Impossibility of international 
peace and cooperation under the pres- 
ent method of teaching history 
which produces as an inevitable re- 
sult, a nationalistic spirit which is 
narrow and antagonistic. Dr. 
Scholz, president of Reed and head 
of, the history department, outlined 
the method of teaching history ta 
Reed, stressing the humanistic or so- 
ciological viewpoints. His state- 
ments drew the complete approval of 
the foreign students. Dr. Scholz also 
closed the discussion with a fifteen 
minute talk in which he condemned 
the liurried attempts at specializa- 
tion by American students and also 
said that the American high school 
is of no value in preparing for a well 
rounded College education. Dr. 
Scholz briefly outlined the first two 
years of curriculum work at Reed 
which is simply for the purpose of 
providing background and which is 
not taken up with any idea of spec- 
ialization. In the third year lec- 
tures are discarded, work being done 
in groups of five or six and in the 
senior year the student is upon his 
own initiative entirely and does not 
attend any classes but is under a 
helper from the faculty. In a con- 
versation with Piet Roest after the 
discussion group, the writer learned 
that he admired Dr. Scholz's plan 
and said that the same plan was now 
being developed in 'Holland, but only 
in their higher institutions which 
correspond to our post graduate work. 

A general discussion was held af- 
ter dinner Friday evening, -preceded 



(Continued on page three) 



Harold Proppe of Linfield College 
won first place in the annual con- 
test of the Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Association of Oregon, which was 
held March ninth, in the First Pres- 
byterian church at Albany, Oregon. 
Second place was won by William 
Harrison at Pacific University. 
Third place went to Roy Skeen of 
Willamette and fourth to Clarence 
Hickock, who represented Oregon 
Agricultural College. 

Mr. Proppe was quite consistent. 
He ranked high in both composition 
and delivery. His oration "A Wide 
Flung Door," was an appeal to 
America to uphold her honor among 
other nations and to aid more mater- 
ially in the protection of the white 
race from the menace of other races. 

The award of second place came 
as a surprise to many of the audience, 
as Mr. Harrison's delivery was not 
unusually good. His oration "The 
Living Yesterday," ranked first in 
thought and composition. This was 
Mr. Harrison's first attempt at ora- 

O V. 

As the list of orators was not 
published with the orations the en- 
tire list of orators was not available. 
The list of orations were as follows: 

"Our Work Is Not Vet Done," 
University of Oregon. 

"America's Strength," Albany 
College. 

"A Wide Flung Door," Linfield 
College. 

"The Living Yesterday," Pacific 
University. 

"Thank God for America," Oregon 
Agricultural College. 

"The Awakening Giant," Oregon 
Normal School. 

"The Third Naturalization Pa- 
pers," Willamette University. 

"Constructive versus Destructive 
Public Opinion," Pacific' College. 

"The Crowning Conquest," Eugene 
Bible University. 

Cecil R. Htnshaw, Pacific's orator, 
won frfth place in the contest. His 
oration as delivered in the contest 
was a finer production than that 
which the home folks heard delivered 
from the chapel platform. 

The system of judging was 
changed this year. Instead of the 
use of the rank system, the percent- 
ages were averaged to find the stand- 
ing of the orators. This makes a 
change in many cases. 

The judges on thought and com- 
position were Thomas C. Trueblood, 
Professor of Public Speaking at the 
University of Michigan; Norma F. 
Coleman, former professor of English 
at Reed College, and E. P. Trueblood. 
professor of Public Speaking at 
Earlham College. The judges on de- 
livery were C. D. Thorpe, U. of 0.; 
M. Darrah, O. N. S.; P. L. Edwards, 
O. A. C; C. M. Pannuzio, Willamette; 
Ruth L. Story, P. U.; G. R. Varney, 
Linfield; S. E. Childer, E. B. U.; Mrs. 
Childs, Albany and Perry D. Macy, 
Pacific. Each judge on delivery 
judged every orator except the repre- 
sentative of his ; school. This is the 
first year that this method of judg- 
ing delivery has been used. 

The music on the program was 
given by members of the College 



Conservatory and consisted of a pi- 
ano and organ duet, vocal solos, piano 
duets and solos and a saxophone solo. 
Clive Saiz, president of the L 0. A. 

0. , presided and presented the bronze 
statue of Lincoln to the winning ora- 
tor. 

Banquet Follows Contest 

After the contest the annual ban- 
quet was held in the basement of the 
church. The room was beautifully 
decorated in Albany's colors. Floor 
lamps cast a mellow glow over the 
well decorated tables. A very good 
banquet was served in a well planned 
four-course style. Dr. Wallace Lee 
of Albany, made a capable toast 
master. The toasts on the theme 
"Social Institutions" were inter- 
sperced with the eating. The toast 
program was as follows: Business, 
Paul X. Knoll; Science, Dan Law- 
rence; Art, Elaine Cooper; Educa- 
tion, Elizabeth Johnson; The Family, 
Oscar Gladish; Charity, W. C. Piper; 
Recreation, Robert Littler, and Gov- 
ernment, by Cleo Howell. Music 
was furnished by a male quartette. 
Esta Ryder, who gave a vocal solo, 
and Glenn S. Taylor, who 1 gave a vio- 
lin solo. 

At an "early" hour a well fed and 
happy crowd started homeward to 
spread the news of the splendid en- 
tertainment Albany gave the contest. 
Thirteen Pacific folks were In at- 
tendance at the contest. 

Business Meetinsr 
The annual business meeting of the 

1. 0. A. O. was held at four o'clock. 
All nine colleges responded to roll 
call. The recommendations of the 
executive committee were accepted. 
The award for first place after this 
year is to be a statue of Demosthenes 
to cost not less than twenty dollars. 
The system of judging was changed 
rrom rank to the percentage method. 
The date of the Peace contest was 
set for April 27, at Willamette Uni- 
versity. Provision was made to ask 
Reed College to participate in the 
Peace contest, ulso to invite them to 
enter a petition to join the associa- 
tion. It was voted to accept such a 
petition, if it were presented. 

The officers for the coming year 
were elected as follows: President, 
Harold Proppe of Linfield; Vice 
President, Maurice Brown oft Oregon 
Normal; Secretary, Edward Sox of 
Albany, and Treasurer, Horace Ter- 
rell of Pacific. 

The monotony of business was 
broken by Instrumental and vocal 
solos. 



Y. W AND Y. Iff. RECEPTION 

The Y. W. and Y. M. reception 
given at the college Friday evening 
was very good and showed great 
preparation. Many interesting games 
were played. Perhaps the most in- 
teresting of all was "Maggie and 
Jiggs." After choosing of partners 
ners, a short program was given in 
the chapel. A few readings and some 
special music was,given. After re- 
freshments of punch and wafers the 
party adjourned. 



1922-23 PACIFIC BAS- 
KET BALL SEASON 
REVIEWED 



Splendid Showing Made by Team 
Thru All- Season 



When the 1922-1923 basket ball 
:<oason opened at Pacific College there 
was a limited supply of good basket 
ball material, by limited we mean 
about six or seven men that looked 
good for team work. 

Two practice games were arranged 
with Linfield and were' a great help 
in moulding the team, for. these 
games showed what style of game 
was best' to use with the material at 
hand. With Terrell with a good, 
keen basket eye it was useless to play 
him in the defense especially, when 
a strong defense could be built about 
such a player as Armstrong. So at 
once a four-man defense and a three- 
man offense began to take form and 
by the first Linfield game it began 
to look as if Pacific might have a 
fair team. As the men worked to- 
gether they became accustomed to 
making good passes. The next big 
task was to get them to fighting in 
the final minutes of the game and 
after the bitter game with Linfield, 
which was lost In th«( last few min- 
utes, this began to take hold and the 
team then showed its ability to fight 
to the finish in both the Albany 
games. 

The! credit lor such a team iB duo 
to the excellent sportsmanship of all 
the team members and the splendid 
backing given the team by the stu- 
dents. The members of the team 
were unselfish in their team play and 
the uppermost thought in their minds 
at all times was to win for Pacific 
rather than personal glory. The stu- 
dent body was out In force and put 
the pep that was missing in 'football 
season into every game. 

A word or two should be said of 
the individual members of the team. 

Terrell was easily the best point 
maker but that was his duty, for he 
was expected in the -defense. During 
the season he was able to pile up 
forty, field goals and five fouls for a 
grand total of eighty-five points in 
the nine games played. His dribbling 
and whirling stood him in good stead 
and his basket eye was always con- 
sistent, altho he was a marked man 
and closely guarded. 

Armstrong, tue silent hero of all 
the games as fat as scoring was con- 
cerned, was always in the fight and 
could be depended upon to give every 
bit he; had. It was about his defen- 
sive work that the defense was built 
and from the score book it can be 
read in between the lines, as no team 
scored over twenty-five points thru 
the team's defense. 

Hinshaw ranked next to Terrell in 
points scored, making twenty field 
baskets and twenty— four free throws 
fpr a grand total of .sbcty-f our points. 
He wan able to cage about fifty per 
cent of the free throws - converting 
twenty-four out of fifty attempts. 
The Albany game was pulled out of 



(Continued on page three) 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at post office at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



Ben Darling Editor-in-Chief 

Olive Terrell Associate Editor 

Flora Campbell Society Editor 

Cecil P. Hinshaw Sports Editor 

Alfred Everest . . . Business Manager 
Gertrude Bates ..Circulation Mgr. 

Reporters — Marie Hester, Royal 
Gettvnann, Charlotte Jones, Helen 
Hester, Florence Lee. 



Terms: 



J1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



EDITORIAL 

This issue of the Crescent is late. 
There are several reasons why it is 
late, none of which can be laid to 
the fault of any particular person or 
persons. Circumstances, that's all. 

One reason is, that the Student 
Body elections upset the regular or- 
der of events and threw the paper 
into new and if not entirely inex- 
perienced hands, hands that were 
strange to the situation. 

Another reason was the failure of 
reporters and students generally to 
get their stuff into the hands of the 
editors in time and in sufficient 
quantity. And, while the paper 
would have been held up probably for 
the Oratorical Contest, and the For- 
eign Students' Conference at Reed 
College, that doesn't excuse the slack- 
ness of reporters or students who 
should be interested enough to get 
something of interest into the College 
publication. 

The whole point is that the Cres- 
cent belongs to the Students of Pa- 
cific, not to the Faculty, nor the ed- 
itors, but the Students. It is for the 
expression of their ideas, (and there 
ought to be ideas in every college,) 
and any topic whatever of interest to 
College people and their friends. 
Besides we all need the training it 
will give us. So let's get together 
and make the Crescent a real medium 
of exchange for ideas and a source 
of real interest to everyone interest- 
ed in the College. 



The Student's Conference at Reed 
Colege was a great success. Center- 
ing around three young men from 
Germany, Holland and Denmark with 
a simple Christian message, each 
young man representing the youth 
movement of his country, which is 
today the only gleam of hope for a 
regenerated Europe. They have seen 
the old system fail, and a new Bys- 
tem which for, a time brought hope, 
fail also, because as Hans Tiesler 
of Germany, said, "We had only 
changed systems, vse had not changed 
the man." The youth movements of 
Europe have no political nor economic 
scheme, but are united in a bond of 
spiritual unity which rises above the 
confines of institutions, denomina- 
tions and of nationalism; to the high 
plane of a world brotherhood in 
Christian faith and practice. 

To one who had experienced the 
fellowship of those with the larger 
vision the Reed Conference was re- 
freshing beyond description. Well 
might we have imagined ourselves 
among a group of young Friends, in 
Conference at Jordans, Philadelphia 
or Richmond. The response of Reed 
College Faculty and Student Body to 
the messages of the three young men 
from over seas show them to be a 
group, not only with a broad vision 
of human needs but a desire as well 
to accomplish something definite in 
the new order of Society. 



It appears that the councillng of 
old men, and fighting of wars by 
young men, hasn't been just what it 
was thought it might imply. Youth 
has sacrificed itself too long on the 
altar of old men's diplomacy, or per- 
haps young men with old Ideas. Now 
it seems that after all, if the Old 
world shall find its way out of the 
morass of its folly, and America stop 
her headlong plunge toward material 
death, that a little child shall indeed, 
lead them. 



Prof. Weesner's Chapel talk Tues- 
day morning plowed deep. The stu- 
dents have needed it for a long time, 
likewise the Faculty. 

o 

Yes, we must change; all living 
forms do. 



STUDENTS ELECT OFFICERS 

The annual election of the Asso- 
ciated Student Body of Pacific Col- 
lege was held last Tuesday evening 
in the College chapel, and the follow- 
ing persons were elected to fill the 
various offices for the coming year: 
President, R. Davis Woodward of 
Newberg; Vice President, Miss Flor- 
ence Lee of Newberg; Secretary, 
Miss Marie Hester of Newberg; 
Treasurer, Wilfred Crozer of New- 
berg; Forensic Manager, Royal Gett- 
mann of Newberg; Editor Crescent, 
Benjamin A. Darling, Everett 
Wash.; Associate Editor, Miss Olive 
Terrell, Portland; Business Manager, 
Alfred R. Everest of Newberg; Clr- 
ulation Manager, Miss Gertrude 
Bates of Seattle, Wash. ; Yell Leader, 
H. Brooks Terrell, Portland; Song 
Leader, Miss Lucille Logston of New- 
berg; Secretary Old Students' Asso., 
Miss Emma G. Fort of Newberg, and 
Property Manager, John Elford of 
Newberg. 



FRIEND OF COLLEGE PASSES 

College and academy classes were 
cut short on Friday, March 2, so that 
the student body and faculty could 
attend the funeral of Mrs. Jesse Ed- 
wards, an Oregon pioneer. 

Mrs. Edwards has been a friend of 
the college since its foundation In 
1885. At this time she and her hus- 
band, who was a member of the 
board, went east in order to raise 
funds for the carrying on of the 
work. On this trip and on a later 
one in 1887, Mr. and Mrs. Edwards 
were successful in that they raised 
substantial sums for the maintenance 
of the institution. 

Not only as a friend of Pacific 
College, was Mrs. Edwards known in 
Newberg, however. As a minister, 
leader of reform, friend, councelor 
and comforter, she Is sincerely 
mourned for by the entire commun- 
ity. 

o 

SPRING 

It's too nice to study, the sun is too 
bright; 

'Four walls and a ceiling," remove 

from my sight! 
The knowledge in books can't reveal 

anything 

To my poor shriveled brain, at the 
coming of spring. 

The birds call me thither; the buds 

on the trees, 
All signs of new life are appearing 

at ease; 

The laughing brook whispers, "Do 

drop everything 
And roam on with me through the 
woods in the Spring." 

But true to my purpose I ever must 
be, 

Make use of the talents once given 
to me; 

In the open I'll study and hear the 

birds sing, 
"Rejoice and be glad, 'tis the coming 

of spring." 



Pacific Takes Albany Into Camn 

On Friday evening, March 3rd, 
Pacific College closed a rather suc- 
cessful basket-ball season in a good 
thriller with the Albany College 
Tigers. 

The Quakers, true to form, ran up 
a large score In the first five min- 
utes with the Tigers scoring but few 
points, however, as the down state 
lads became accustomed to the floor 
their basket eye improved as far as 
long shots were concerned and the 
first half ended with the score 13 
to 10 with the Quakers leading. 

The Albany boys came back with a 
rush and scored enough points to put 
them in the lead, at the running 
score count of 15 to 14. A basket by 
Terrell overcame this and with but 
a one point lead Crozer was substi- 
tuted for Terrell, the game was a 
great scrap then for five minutes 
without a score on either side. With 
five minutes to go Terrell replaced 
Crozer and came thru with two pretty 
baskets while Hinshaw added a free 
throw. Albany secured but one 
point during this time altho Stein- 
cipher blew in his only close-in shot 
of the game with a poor throw. 

The Albany Tigers proved up to 
their name and provided plenty of 
fight during the game. 

Steincipher was easily their best 
man but he was aided materially by 
the rest of his team mates. 

Terrell again stood out as high 
point man. His team mates were 
always digging up the ball and feed- 
ing him. Armstrong's defensive work 
was up to par and Cook's floor work 
was a feature of the contest. 

Pacific (21) (16) Albany 

Hinshaw (5) R.F. Cooley 
Cook L.F. (14) Steincipher 

Terrell (14) C Van Winkle 

Armstrong R. G. Sox 
Jones (2) L.G. (2) Henderson 

Crozer S 

Summary: — Field Goals (Pacific) 
Hinshaw (2), Terrell (7), Jones. 
(Albany) Steincipher (6), Hender- 
son. Free Throws (Pacific) Hin- 
shaw 1 ont of 3, (Albany) Stein- 
cipher 2 out of 3. 

Personal Fouls: Jones (2), Van- 
Winkle. 

Referee: Parker. 



PACIFIC SECURES 

BUSINESS' MANAGER 



The Board of Managers of Pacific 
College have received just recently 
from Stacy J. McCracken of Wichita, 
Kansas, his definite acceptance of the 
position of Financial Secretary, to 
which he was called at the annual 
meeting of the Board, February 9. 

Mr. McCracken -wll enter upon his 
duties here at the close of the Col- 
lege year, being under contract with 
Friends University of Wichita, Kan- 
sas, up until that time. There is 
probably no man among Friends in 
AmericB, who is better fitted for this 
position than Stccy J. McCracken. 
Not only is he an able financial di- 
rector, but is truly representative of 
Friends and will increase the inter- 
ests of Friends among all with whom 
he comes in contact. 

This is a forward step for Pacific 
College, and has been needed for a 
long time. It will release a great 
many burdens from the shoulders of 
those who are not able to carry 
them while trying to fill equally re- 
sponsible positions, and will besides 
mean the standardization of Pacific 
in a comparatively short time. 
o- 

LETTERS FROM AUNT LOU 

I. B. A. Freek. 
Dear Sonny: 

Your case is a very unusual one 
indeed. I would suggest that you 
call on Father Time to settle the 
matter. 

AUNT LOU. • 
o 

Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



Black 122 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh. Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 

THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION PRUGGIST 



VINCENT'S FEED STORE 

808 First Street 

Best Quality of 
FEED AND FLOUR 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 
Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 
NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



BAGS 
TRUNKS and GLOVES 

703 FirBt Street 
A. C. SMITH 



VISIT THE FAIR 
5c and 10c Store 
WALLACE & SON 

607 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



STUDENTS 

For the easiest shave and 
most up-to-date hair cut, 
go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, Prop. 

Ice cream and candies. We fea- 
ture the famous Lowney's Candies. 
Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



SOCIETY AND COMMERCIAL 

Printing 

AT THE GRAPHIC OFFICE 



DORM DOPE 

The six Straight-Shooters met in 
Frozen Inn one Saturday at 11:30 
a. mi. and enjoyed juicy, hot winnies 
between hot buttered rolls. While 
others were enjoying their lunch in 
the dining room, these hilarious 
creatures moved stealthily outside, 
and filled what utensils they could 
find, with snow. Those who emerged 
from the doors below received a 
good bombarding from upper win- 
dows. The greatest advantage of the 
whole party was that the carpet of I 
the/ fort didn't have to be sprinkled 
before being swept. 

One night it seemed that every girl 
was hungry. Just what aroused the ' 
appetite no one knows, but a remedy 
was found. The girls assembled in 
"Come Inn" and relished sandwiches 
of hot toast and pimento cheese; 
also olives, pickles and pineapple. 

The new carpet oa the main floor 
has afforded much comfort, and en- 
joyment. It really is quite a silencer. 

Our visitors recently have been: 
Sadie Read and Myrna James from 
Portland, also Mary Johnson, Dr. 
Hester, Lucille Logston, Lucille Eh- 
ret and Flora Campbell. 

There has been quite an interest 
aroused in the minds of the dorm 
girls. Some of thesedays in the 
near future do not be surprised to 
see a book published on "Dorm Life" 
or some such topic. It will most as- 
suredly be interesting, containing a 
chapter written by each girl. 



1922-23 PACIFIC BASKET 

BALL SEASON REVIEWED 



(Continued from page one) 



STUDENT CONFERENCE AT 

REED COLLEGE INSPIRING 



Y. W. C. A. 

The service for recognition to. new 
members was held on Wednesday, 
Feb. 29. Organ and violin music 
was rendered as the girls assembled, 
after which a very appropriate duet 
by Florence Lee and Lucille Logston. 
The candle service was held as usual 
except that the new members stepped 
through the blue triangle, the Y. W. 
seal, before acknowledged as mem- 
bers. Six new members were taken 
into Y. W. fellowship; also two as- 
sociate members were transferred as 
active members. The service was 
helpful and inspiring. 

Miss Mary Sutton had charge of 
the Y.W.meeting Thursday, March 9. 
Her topic "What are your measure- 
ments?" was very well given. She 
said some girls' standard was meas- 
ured by clothes, some by deeds, etc., 
but all these standards would fail. 
The only one' that wouldn't fail was 
the measure of the standard as given 
in the Bible. 



WE SUGGEST 

That Dilla Tucker not make candy 
to give to the dogs. 

That Spud Everest get a Derby 
Hat. 

That Bernice Hinshaw get a mim- 
eograph. 

That Shortie Nordyke wait a lit- 
tle longer before asking for a per- 
son's name. 

That Babe Tucker start an orches- 
tra. 

That the girls' dormitory be turned 
Into an infirmary. 

That somebody turn off the rain. 

That GladyB Scott take a course in 
husbandry before graduating. 

That Crescent reporters have all 
eyes and ears open during the next 
two weeks. 

That Freshman Rhetoric class 
watch for peculiar agents to write 
description of Classified Advertise- 
ments, Wanted Position, etc. 
o 

WANTED — Position a coronet 
player. .Apply to Apply to A. Wen- 
dell, Address, Salem, Oregon. 

WANTED — A partner to go. on a 
little snipe hunt. Applicants apply 
to B. A. Darling. Get your applica- 
tion in early and avoid the rush. 
o 

Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



the fire in the last few minutes by 
his free throwing. 

Cook, altho one of the three which 
generally worked down toward the 
scoring basket, was used as a floor 
man, and developed wonderfully 
along that line. His great fighting 
ability was admired by every one. 
His great feat was to get up out of 
bed, having been sick all day, and 
play the home game against Linfield. 
Altho Cook scored only twelve points 
during the season, the final scores in 
most games would have been much 
different if he had not been in. to dig 
up the ball for Terrell and Hinshaw. 

Jones, the other silent guard, was 
another one of those excellent floor 
and defensive men, who could be 
counted on at various times for bas- 
kets. He scored during the season 
four field goals all of which came at 
times when they were needed. Jones 
was not the type of player that stood 
out from the rest of the players on 
the team but was a quiet man "who 
was known better by hist team mates 
and the coach than by the fans. 
When he was out the effect was not- 
iceable upon the team plays. 

B. Terrell, Crozer, Brown, Pearson 
and Cramlet all had a chance at var- 
ious times in the season and proved 
their worth by plenty of fight and 
some times by their basket eyes. B. 
Terrell won the game with the 
Teachers in the last minute of play. 
The most credit is due these felows 
because of their splendid spirit of 
loyalty to the team and school for 
staying out after they knew the team 
was picked and they had no chance 
except to prepare for another season. 
o 

ACADEMY ATHLETICS NEEDED 

The object of this write-up is not 
so especially to review the Academy 
basket ball season as it is to appeal 
to* the think folk about school. 

The Academy men must be trained 
better along athletic lines, for from 
the past season you can see where Pa- 
cific College basket ball men came 
from for eight out of the ten mem- 
bers of the squad came from the 
Academy. 

The Academy has been troubled in 
getting games with high school 
teams and were forced to play against 
heavier and older teams. This may 
be remedied by joining the State 
High School Athletic Association. 

The Academy will have next year 
a fair amount of good basket ball 
material in the following named 
men: Hunnington, Sweet, M. Brown, 
S. Brown, Leonard, Everestt, Ken- 
dall, Hester and others. Now re- 
member, folks, the Pacific College 
teams of the future depend largely 
upon men from the Academy and 
the Academy should be considered a 
valuable feeder for the College and 
must be provided with athletic 
training. 

o 

THE Y. W. C. A. ENTER- 
TAIN GIRL RESERVES 



Saturday evening, March 10, at 
7:29 at Wood Mar Hall, the Y. W. 
C. A. of Pacific College entertained 
the Girl Reserves of the High 
Schools. 

The evening started with a get- 
together game of hunting peanuts. 
Signs of "Chataqua," Chataqua," 
were seen posted around; finally the 
mystery was revealed, and the girls 
divided into six groups and gave a 
six-day "Chataqua." Refreshments 
were served which brought the even- 
ing to a close. 

We were very glad of the chance to 
get better acquainted with the Girl 
Reserves. We hope they come again. 



(Co ntinued from page one) 

by a short talk by Hans Tiesler. 

The discussion Saturday morning 
had to do with economic conditions 
and was opened by an outline of the 
Danish cooperative system by Jor- 
gen Hoick. This resulted in a lively 
discission of general and state so- 
cialism which came to no agreement. 

Saturday afternoon a Columbia 
River Highway trip to Multnomah 
Falls was given the delegates and af- 
ter supper the time was spent in 
dancing until the hour for the French 
play, presented by the Reed Players. 
This, was a delightful romantic trag- 
edy, tree from the realism of the 
later French writers. 

Sunday morning the last meeting 
of the conference was held and was 
booked by Dr. Pannunzio of Willam- 
ette and Dr. Scholz of Reed. 

The conference was a decided suc- 
cess and very much of an eye opener. 
All the discussion groups were alive 
with interest. No active campaign 
will be carried on among the colleges 
of the state and the delegates were 
not urged to do anything in this 
work. The conference was given 
only to make students think and 
from the informal manner and gen- 
eral atmosphere at Reed one could 
not help being aroused. 

o 

TREFIAN 

Hail, vernal equinox ! That 
spring is really here was demonstrat- 
ed to any possible doubters by the 
program of March 7. Elizabeth Sil- 
ver sang Mendelsohn's "Spring 
Song," by way of introducing the 
subject. Two spring poems which, 
to quote the critic, rivalled Longfel- 
low or any of those other poets, 
were- given by Hazel Newhouse. 
"Leaves from the Diary of the God- 
dess Spring," a highly original phan- 
tasy, was presented by Mary Pen- 
nington. "The Real Thing in Camp- 
ustry," as shown by Mary Elliot and 
Esther Gulley, as a harassed senior 
couple; Louise Nelson, an absent- 
minded professor with Retha Tucker 
as her not-too-enthusiastic pupil; 
and Charlotte Jones and Iva Dell 
Crozer, a love-lorn academy pair — 
, well, it was the real thing. Rather 
too real, the assembled company 
realized, when, after having 
watched sandwiches, pickles, apples, 
etcetera, disappear with remarkable 
rapidity, they were offered tooth- 
picks. 

Mulr Clarke summarized the 
"Song of the Cardinal" and read ex- 
tracts therefrom in a very sympath- 
etic manner. "Fleecy Clouds," a 
' duet by Eunice Lewis and Grace Con- 
over, very fittingly brought the meet- 
ing to a close. If you don't believe 
spring is here, ask any Treff.ian 
member about it. 

I ° 

CAN YOU IMAGINE: 

Philips Haworth as a hurdle jump- 
er. 

Harriett Hodgin us a magazine 
agent. 

George F o o t e as a temperance 
speaker. 

Robert Shattuck as a policeman. 
Dilla Tucker running an oyster 
house. 

President Pennington as a nurse- 
maid. 

C. R. Hinshaw as a brick layer. 
Albert Wendell as a speed cop. 
Spud Everest as a human! fly. 
Prof. Jones teaching sewing and 
cooking. 

o 

FOR SALE 

Olive Armstrong says, "Not Me." 

One set of perfectly good brains, 
never been used, for sale or lease, or 
exchange, for something equaly as 
valuable. 



Dear Aunt Lou: 

I have been going with a .boy for 
some time but I am in perplexity to 
know whether he likes me or not. 
He is quite bashful. Please tell me 
how I could find out whether he likes 
me or not. Yours in anxious wait- 
ing, Miss Ima Rubberneck. 



CAMPBELL'S CONFECTIONEY 

Hoefffler's Chocolates 
"MACBETH" 

Shakespeare's Classic, for Sale 



C. J. BREEER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



EJENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 
Best of Bread; Finest Cakes, 
Pies like Mother nsed to make. 



I 

i r 



Yon Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 

GEM BARBER SHOP 

E. L. MORLEY, PROPRIETOR 



RYGG THE TAILOR 

Tailoring, French Dry Cleaning, 
Alterations, Pressing 
602% FIRST STREET 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 
Delivery before and after school 
Phone Red 66 

MOORE & SON 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



Will B. Brooks 
PRINTER 

410 First St. Phone Black ! 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 

Pressing, Cleaning 
Repairing 
314 FIRST ST. NEWBERG, OR. 



"listen In" 

WHAT YOU EAT AMD WHAT 
YOU WEAR 

Get it at the 
"GOOD GOODS" HOME 

Miller mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 
THE STORE OP QUALITY 

Furniture, Carpets, 
Undertakers 

500 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



DE. THOS. W. HESTER 
Physician and Surgeon 
Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, - OREGON 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOB 
LITTLE HONEY 



Yours for Service and Quality 

ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



C. A. MOBRI! 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



DB. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171. 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 
E. W. HODSON, Reg. Phar. 
School Supplies, Drugs, 
Confections 

Corner First and Meridian 



SHOE SHINE PARLOR 
Best of Shines Efficient Service 
Candy , Bars, Good Confections 

BOB WALKER 



Academy Life 

Indications lead to the belief that 
the Academy has improved greatly. 
The Academy Study Hall hasn't been 
the painful witness of a lecture for 
a long time, but a calm always pre- 
ceeds a storm. 

Wilbur Elliott doesn't quite ap- 
prove of the Academy Ladies' aid so- 
ciety. He's thinking of a Men's aid 
society with a woman at its head. 

Rose Ellen Hale is rejoicing great- 
ly at the unexpected arrival of her 
parents from California. She ac- 
companied her father, who could not 
remain, to Portland and spent Sat- 
urday, the 24th with him. 

The Academy team has been posing 
for pictures and as a result several 
good ones have been obtained. 

In learning the ancient art of 
Pyramid building, William Freer met 
with a catastrophe (or rather met 
with the floor) and injured his 
arm. 

The C. E. R. initiation proved dis- 
astrous both to Exceedingly Round 
and Exceedingly Tall. Ivor managed 
to come to school Thursday but Philip 
hasn't ventured out since. That's 
two officers at one shot. 

Tuesday was the date of the first 
"tuning up" of the P. A. orchestra. 

Vernon Newby has purchased a 
new Trombone and is working hard 
trying to learn to play it. 

Carl Crane, also is slowly but 
surely mastering his Claironette 
playing. 

We just learned that Wesley and 
Rollin Shaad and Sandy Brown play 
horns, that Eldon Everest plays a 
Tromhone and that Hugh Bowerman 
is a good director. 

As a reward for every member hi 
the class having a perfect lesson in. 
Algebra, Miss Lee treated them to 
"All day suckers." She says that she 
thinks folks look eo intelligent with 
a stick sticking out of their mouths. 

It is reported that both Homer and 
Eldon are considering moving to Cali- 
fornia on account of their fondness 
for "Olives." 

o 

JOKES 

B. T. — They don't raise anything 
but umbrellas in Seattle. 



Mrs. Conover: — Of course a feeble- 
minded person would never reach a 
colege freshman class; but a sub- 
normal student might, so don't fix 
your hopes too high. 



The girls decided the weeds in 
their tennis court were getting too 
fresh, so they saltedthemdown. "It 
will be good enough to play tennis 
soon if it don't rain." 



STANDING OF CONTESTANTS IN ORATORICAL CONTEST 



G. B. — I must be an umbrella then. 
Miss J — Maybe you arn't raised 
yet. 



Mr. Weesner maintains that there 
are only six functions in trigonom- 
etry. But Dilla T. has found a new 
one — the "So-cant." 



Al — -What's the matter Shortie, 
did you scratch the silverware? 

Shortie — No, it wasn't scratched 
enough. 



Pal — Girls, when are we going to 
write our book? 

M. H. — Well, we could write a 
whole chapter on Babe's chin now. 
o 

Setting — Plane Geometry room. 

Theme — Indignant Pedagogue. 

Lessons were very unsatisfactory 
one morning causing the state of 
mind of the pedagogue. As she 
passed from pupil to pupil, she asked 
for the time each had spent on his 
lesson. At each report of ten or fif- 
teen minutes, she gave them a fear- 
ful look and said, "I'll see you in 
the woodshed." 
„. Result — Penitent Students. 

The offending ones, having heard 
considerable about Roosevelt and the 
Big Stick, were sorely perplexed. At 
last they hit upon a plan. They ob- 
tained a piece of cord wood about 4 
feet long and 4 inches in diameter. 
With some kind of a dull instrument 
they chewed off ope end for a good 
hand hold. The product of their 
labors was - placed in the teacher's 
chair with the message "Presented 
to Miss Lee by the P. G. Class. To 
save you trouble we brought the 
woodshed to you." 





Delivery 


Composition 




ORATIONS 


to 
+j .... 


erage 
r cent 


C. True- 
blood 


P. Cole- 
man 




mmavy 


a 




o o 




E-i 






to 


E 


Our Work is Not Yet Done — 
















U. of O. 


693 


86.62 


80 


80 


80 


.167.95 


8 


America's Strength — Albany 


636 


79.50 


75 


75 


75 


154.50 


9 


A Wide Flung Door — Linfield 


737 


92.12 


100 


100 


84 


186.78 


1 


The Living Yesterday — P. U. 


706 


88.12 


96 


90 


100 


183-45 


2 


Thank God for America — 0. 
















A. C. 


773 


96.62 


94 


• 78 


79 


180.95 


4 


The Awakening Giant — Ore- 
















gon Normal 


706 


88.25 


78 


86 


76 


168.35 


7 


The Third Naturalization Pa- 
















pers — Willamette 


721 


90.12 


90 


94 


94 


182.78 


3 


Constructive vs. Destructive 
















Public Opinion- -P. C. 


674 


84.25 


86 


92 


96 


175.58 


5 


The Crowning Conquest — E. 
















B. U. 


704 


88.00 


84 


84 


78 


168.66 


6 



E. C. RATED 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 
Phone Bed 37 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
ROLL OF HONOB BANK 

Capital and Surplus .$160,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newherg, Oregon 
KEEP Y0UB RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Bay Diagnosis 

OVER U. S. BANK 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



D n 11 Time is Here, and Our Stock 

OaSe Dall Is Complete 

Parker Hardware Co. 



CHEERFUL SERVICE AT 

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BASEBALL SUPPLIES